The Categorical Model of Linear Logic

Jul 31 2006 Published by under Category Theory, goodmath

Today we'll finally get to building the categories that provide the model for
the multiplicative linear logic. Before we jump into that, I want to explain why it is that we separate out the multiplicative part.
Remember from the simply typed lambda calculus, that [we showed that the type system was precisely a subset of intuitionistic logic][lambda-type], and that programs in the lambda calculus corresponded to proofs in the type system. In particular, it was propositional intuitionistic logic using only the "→" operation. Similarly, if you build up a more interesting typed lambda calculus like [System-F][systemf], the type system is intuitionist logic *with* the "∀" quantifer and the "∧" operator, but without "∨", negation, or "∃". Why do we eliminate the existentials and friends? Because if we left them in, then the *type system* becomes Turing complete and undecidable. If we're careful, we can analyze a program using universal types, logical and (composition in lambda), and implication and infer the types if it's a valid program. (Actually, even System-F is undecidable without any type annotations, but HMF - the Hindley-Milner subset, *is* decidable. NP-hard, but decidable.)
The main reason that people like me really care about linear logic is because there is a variant of lambda calculus that includes *linear types*. Linear types are types where referencing the value corresponding to the type *consumes* it. For dealing with the semantics of real programming languages, there are many things that make sense as linear types. For example, the values of an input stream behave in a linear way: read something from an input stream, and it's not there anymore: unless you copied it, to put it someplace safe, it's gone.
For typing linear lambda calculus, we use *intuitionistic linear logic* with the *multiplicative* operators. They give us a *decidable* type system with the capability to express linear type constraints.
Enough side-tracking; back to the categories.
We can now finally define a *linear category*. A category C is a linear category if it is both a [cartesian category][cartesian] and a [monoidal][monoidal] [closed category][monclose] with a *dualizing functor*. A dualizing functor is a *contravariant* closed functor defining properties of the categorical exponential, written (-)* : C → C. (That should be read with "-" as a placeholder for an object; and * as a placeholder for an exponent.) (-)* has the property that there is a natural isomorphism d : Id ≡ (-)** (That is, d is an identity natural isomorphism, and it's equivalent to applying (-)* to the result of applying (-)* ) such that the following commutes:

linear-dual.jpg

So, what does this mean? Take the linear implication operator; mix it with the categorical exponent; and what you get *still* behaves *linearly*: that is, if "X -o Y"; that is, one X can be consumed to produce one Y, then 2 Xs can be consumed to produce 2 Ys; and N Xs can be consumed to produce N Ys.
So a linear category behaves cleanly with exponents; t has a linear implication; it has an *eval* operator (from the fact that it's a cartesian category) to perform the linear implications; it has tensor for producing groups of resources. That's it; that's everything we need from categories for a model of linear logic.
Now, there's just one more question: are there any real linear categories that make sense as a model for linear logic? And obviously, the answer is yes. There are two of them, called **CPO** and **Lin**.
**CPO** is the category with continuous partial orders as objects, and monotonic functions as morphisms. Think about that, and it makes a whole lot of sense for linear logic; the equivalence classes of the partial order are resources of the same "value" (that is, that can be exchanged for one another); and you can't climb *upwards* in the partial order without adding something.
The other one, **Lin**, is a lot more complicated. I'm not going to explain it in detail; that would lead into another two-month-long series! But to put it briefly, **Lin** is the category with *coherent domains* as objects, and linear maps as morphisms. To make that make sense, I would have to explain domain theory, which (to put it mildly) is complicated; the short version is that a domain is a kind of CPO. But the reason we care about **Lin** is that programming language semantics are generally described using [*denotational semantics*][denote]; and denotational semantics are built using a kind of domain, called a Scott domain. So this gives us a domain that we can use in programming language semantics with exactly the properties we need to explain how linear types work.
[lambda-type]: http://goodmath.blogspot.com/2006/06/finally-modeling-lambda-calculus.html
[systemf]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_F
[cartesian]: http://scienceblogs.com/goodmath/2006/06/categories_products_exponentia_1.php
[monclose]: http://scienceblogs.com/goodmath/2006/07/towards_a_model_for_linear_log_1.php
[monoidal]: http://scienceblogs.com/goodmath/2006/07/the_category_structure_for_lin_1.php
[denote]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denotational_semantics

No responses yet

Leave a Reply